Ajahn Mun

Patipada: Venerable Acariya Mun’s Path of Practice

Patipada: Venerable Acariya Mun’s Path of Practice

This book is a translation of the Dhutanga Kammaṭṭhāna practices of Ajahn Mun Bhūridatta Thera, and it was written by Venerable Ajahn Mahā Boowa Ñāṇasampanno Thera as a companion volume to the biography of Venerable Ācariya Mun.

This book includes many things that may not be easy to understand for the reader who is not familiar with the theory and practice of Theravada Buddhism. For this reason the reader may find that for the first reading it is better to skip over many of the deeper explanations of the Dhamma teaching, and to go on to the methods and practices of the Ācariyas which are related herein. However, it should be realized that one cannot get a full and proper understanding of the ways in which these Ācariyas practiced without also reading about the underlying reasons for what they did.


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About Ajahn Mun

Ajahn Mun Bhuridatta (1870–1949) was a Thai bhikkhu from Isan region who is credited, along with his mentor, Ajahn Sao Kantasīlo, with establishing the Thai Forest Tradition or "Kammaṭṭhāna tradition" that subsequently spread throughout Thailand and to several countries abroad.

Ordained as a monk in 1893, he spent the remainder of his life wandering through Thailand, Burma, and Laos, dwelling for the most part in the forest, engaged in the practice of meditation. Ajahn Mun's mode of practice was solitary and strict. He followed the vinaya (monastic discipline) faithfully, and also observed many of what are known as the 13 classic dhutanga (ascetic) practices, such as living off alms food, wearing robes made of cast-off rags, dwelling in the forest and eating only one meal a day.

Searching out secluded places in the wilds of Thailand and Laos, he avoided the responsibilities of settled monastic life and spent long hours of the day and night in meditation. In spite of his reclusive nature, he attracted a large following of students willing to put up with the hardships of forest life in order to study with him.

You yourselves must strive, the Buddhas only point the way

Buddha, Dhp 276

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